In this Issue…

Jazz in the Park Saturday June 19

Lake Wingra Cleanup

President's Column

Plant, Dig and Pull in Glenwood Children's Park

Bike/Ped Path Update

Aldernotes

DMNA Welcome Monroe Street Consignment Antiques

Tavern Expansion Plans Concern Neighbors

Focus on Lake Wingra, Summer 99

Pregnant? Help us Learn How to Prevent Childhood Asthma


 
 
 
 

Jazz in the Park Saturday June 19

 

 

The Annual Jazz In The Park will commence on the grass Saturday, June 19 with the sun above us, the lake before us, and the big tent between us all to help celebrate the season and the reasons we live in this great neighborhood. At 2:30 p.m. festivities will commence - so be prepared to mingle, jaw, and boogie in the park. Jazz In the Park is a family event designed to chill us all in the hot summer days, so feel free to breathe in sights, sounds and smells of jazz and R&B, DMNA style.
The fine folks at the Monroe Street Fine Arts Center will provide art activities for children of all ages from 4:00 to 5:00 p.m. at activities tables near the big music tent.

 For those of you with more jazz than pizzazz in your jeans - let the music begin. Jazz West will kick it off with a performance beginning at 2:30. Mama Digdown's Brass Junction will perform for two hours beginning at 4:00 p.m. Bring your chairs and blankets (as if you'll be sitting still). We highly recommend bringing your picnic favorites, which for many, includes food from any of the neighborhood eateries.
 The bands need a break between performances and the park needs to be cared for so what better time to pick up litter in the park and throw it away? All children are welcome to get a litter bag for the Children's Park Pick Up from 6:00 6:30 p.m. When the picker-uppers turn in the little litter bags, they will get a coupon for an ice cream cone from Michael's Custard, a cool treat for some cool kids.
 The park is clean. The coolers have been refilled and the dancing feet are ready to go again. Thank the Laurel Tavern for knowing we need more music. The Laurel's sponsorship gives us another chance to dance and sing with the wonderful Clyde Stubblefield Band from 6:30 p.m. - 8:30 p.m. This year is the fifth year Clyde and Friends have hit the high note to welcome summer to the Dudgeon-Monroe Neighborhood. This is the fifth year we couldn't be happier. Let's dance.
 Nostalgic already? Remember the event by purchasing T-Shirts with a new design and wonderful color! Or stick around for the door prizes - throughout the evening your name could be drawn to win a certificate from URBAN PIZZA (so good!), CREOLE CAFE (can you say "etouffee?") or the LAUREL TAVERN (burgers and a ball game on TV) if you purchase a T-shirt.



Lake Wingra Cleanup:

A nice way to start the Day

Summer calls to mind sunny days, blue skies and paddling along the Lake Wingra shore; unfortunately, not all of us have a boat docked in our backyard. However, thanks to the DMNA's 8th Annual Lake Cleanup and the generosity of the Wingra Canoe and Sailing Center, folks can paddle on Lake Wingra at no cost and be a good neighbor in the process - all that is required is some time and labor on Saturday, June 19.
 The Lake and Shore Cleanup will commence in the morning, from 10:30 to noon. "It would be a nice way to start the day," says Jane Riley, Chair of the DMNA Wingra Committee, "and then come back later in the day for the music."
 Those interested should meet near the boathouse in Wingra Park near the docks to sign up and receive their shoreline section assignment. The work can be messy, muddy and wet, so bring work gloves and garden tools to scoop the debris, suggests Riley. Canoes, floatation devices and garbage bags are provided by the sponsors. For landlubbers, the cleanup crew welcomes volunteers to sign up and walk along the path at the end of the park to pick up shoreline debris.
 "It's a treat to canoe on Lake Wingra so why not clean up along the way? You'll feel good about it all summer long," says Riley. And while you're out there, why not start a family tradition with dad? Since it is Father's Day weekend, perhaps dads and kids can share some special time together. If kids or parents are interested in the long-term goals of keeping Lake Wingra healthy, stop by the Friends of Lake Wingra booth, located in the park during the Jazz in the Park festivities. Friends of Lake Wingra are a whole new community of folks who share the common purpose of promoting a healthy Lake Wingra through an active watershed community.
 This year DMNA welcomes "Take A Stake in the Lakes," a project of the Dane County Lakes and Watershed Commission. Wingra Park is the check-in site for this year's "Take A Stake" clean up of Lake Kegonsa and Lake Mendota. Stop by their tent to find out about keeping ALL our lakes clean and healthy.
 

DMNA Thanks the Jazz in the Park Sponsors for their Support

Special thanks to the Evjue Foundation and the Laurel Tavern


President's Column

By Bill Barker

We did indeed return to Georgia this year to witness the coming of Spring. Our flight left Madison on a bright and sunny morning with temperatures already in the high sixties, only to land in Atlanta amid a cold and blowing rainstorm. Despite that oddly incongruous beginning, we were cheered to find the azalea wave beginning to build. Over the next two weeks, the wave crested and broke over the city, followed closely by the beloved dogwoods and an old friend I had completely forgotten, wisteria. A flowering vine with large, pendant, clusters of pale purple blossoms, wisteria is especially impressive when allowed to overgrow a large "century" oak.
 My wife and I dearly love Atlanta, and over the years we have often talked of "going home". So it was no small surprise when we turned to each other one afternoon and simultaneously blurted out "I don't want to live here anymore". In the intervening eight years since we called ourselves Atlantans, friends have moved on, restaurants have closed or taken favorite treats off the menu, and sadly, even fabulous Oxford Books has fallen to the chain bookstores. But our dissatisfaction runs deeper than the loss of a place to get outrageous oreo cheesecake or root through obscure books at midnight; sprawl and congestion have begun to seriously degrade the quality of life in Atlanta and its surrounds. Oh, traffic on the interstates at rush hour was a nightmare ten years ago, but intowners who knew the surface routes were only slightly affected. In fact, I used to enjoy the thought of Newt Gingrich's core constituents slowly broiling in a July interstate traffic jam as they inched their way home to the white-flight gated communities surrounding Atlanta's North side.
 In my time in Madison, I have seen the same sort of irresponsible development and sprawl in Dane and surrounding counties. So in one sense, I see in Atlanta a version of our own future here in Madison. Disturbingly, one oft-cited answer for sprawl directly contributed to the vastly different Atlanta we found this spring. Developers, responding to skyrocketing intown land values and a national trend against sprawl, are assembling parcels and converting entire neighborhoods to higher density housing. One result is massive congestion on all surface streets and an ozone level so high that Atlanta is ineligible for federal highway funding.
 I hope we can learn from Atlanta's mistakes and avoid the slow and inexorable ruination of our home here. I surfed the county's web site from Atlanta and was delighted to see ten to one support in our district for the overwhelmingly successful Dane County green space referendum. The DMNA is working actively on many fronts to protect the quality of life in our neighborhood. One glance at a map illustrates our dilemma. We live in a long and narrow corridor on either side of Monroe Street, a major arterial from the burgeoning sprawl in the suburbs to a rapidly growing major research university and newly revitalized downtown area of the state capitol. We are literally caught between the proverbial rock and a hard place. Whether it is a DMNA representative meeting with UW officials to ensure we are considered in traffic studies relating to the Engineering Centers building, serving on the West Beltline/Verona Road Interchange Study Committee, or speaking in opposition to developments that will add to the traffic load of Monroe Street, one thing is clear. We must look beyond the borders of our neighborhood to effectively safeguard and enhance the quality of life within it.


Plant, Dig and Pull in Glenwood Children's Park

Hooray! It is finally time to plant the plants, dig the holes and pull the Garlic Mustard. Volunteers are needed to come and help with the restoration work in Glenwood Children's Park. The outdoor rooms, or tree rings designed by Jens Jensen were planted early May. The Mother's Ring, the Dancing Ring and the Sing Ring are planted at the base of the slope off of Glenway Street. Landscapers planted three Hawthorn trees, Jensen's trademark, and the Service Berry for the Sing Ring, but volunteers planted Mountain Maple for the Mother's Ring and Redbud for the Dancing Ring. Along the berm down by Cross Street, we planted some native Roses. Dogwood Pagoda now surrounds the soon-to-be-restored council ring. In the coming weeks additional plants will be added to the newly revitalized park. However, there is a substantial amount of Garlic Mustard in the park that needs to be removed. It is an aggressive plant that will take over any desirable plants we want to grow there. It will be a long term project to eliminate it from the park, but we are optimistic that it can be done. Take a walk down to the park and discover what a special place Glenwood Children's Park is. Volunteer work parties are every Saturday at 9:30am. With help this historic park will look it's best for it's 50th anniversary this October. For more information, contact Maggie Jungwirth at 233-6663.


Bike/Ped Path Update

As you may have noticed, the City of Madison has begun planning and design of a new bike and pedestrian path through the neighborhood. The trail will be located on the abandoned I.C.G. railroad corridor which roughly parallels Monroe Street through our neighborhood and separates it from the Glenway golf course and the cemetery. The complete project extends from the Capital City Bike Trail in Fitchburg to Randall Avenue on the UW-Madison campus, crossing the Beltline on the newly-constructed pedestrian bridge just west of the Verona Road interchange.
 The trail is being designed for the City by the engineering firm Earth Tech. Managing the project for Earth Tech is a 10-year resident of the neighborhood (and former DMNA officer) Tony Fernandez. There will be a formal public involvement process for the project with at least one public information meeting and several neighborhood meetings. In addition, Tony welcomes any comments, suggestions or questions that any neighbors may have. "I'm excited about this path," said Tony. "Not only as an alternative to more cars on Monroe Street but also as a way of linking and strengthening the neighborhood. I think the path has the potential to become a positive focal point for the neighborhood, somewhat the way Wingra Park is today." Tony can be reached at 828-8133(w) or 233-5449 (h), or e-mail tony_fernandez@earthtech.com.
 The DMNA has formed a committee to address neighborhood issues and concerns about the planning, design, construction and maintenance of the trail. The committee is headed by Paul Beckett. Among the issues that the committee will discuss are: access points between the path and neighborhood streets, tree and brush cutting for construction of the path, landscaping and drainage, lighting, privacy for adjacent neighbors, and use of the corridor for other purposes such as skiing and dog walking. Paul's committee will be working with the City and Earth Tech to make sure that the concerns of the neighborhood are heard and become part of the planning. The committees meetings are open to anyone who wishes to attend; monthly meetings are planned. For meeting dates see the DMNA Website calendar (at www.dmna.org) or contact Paul. Paul can be reached by e-mail at pbeckett@facstaff.wisc.edu or by phone at 238-2580.
 Most of the planning and design will take place over the next nine months, and construction is anticipated in the year 2000. The Public Information Meeting is planned for late summer, and residents along the path will be notified of the date and time by mail. Notice will also be published in the newspaper, and every effort will be made to get the information into the Hornblower. For the next issue of the Hornblower, when the planning process is farther along, we plan a more in-depth article about the trail design and how specific neighborhood issues are being addressed.


Aldernotes

By Ken Golden

Edgewood Drive Closure. I recently surveyed the residents of Woodrow Street to determine their preferences regarding the possible closing of Edgewood Drive to automobile traffic. The survey includes options ranging from complete closure to seasonal closure to no closure at all. Woodrow Street relies on Edgewood Drive as an access route particularly when access via Monroe Street is difficult due to snow. I will use the survey results to guide further planning.
 Closing Edgewood Drive to automobile traffic, for all or part of the year is intended to recognize the unique qualities of that location and to reserve its use for mostly pedestrians and bicyclists. While automobile traffic would still be permitted on the drive, a barrier would be erected in the middle (similar to the Arboretum) to prevent through traffic. Edgewood College and Grade School would maintain access to their driveways. Automobile traffic would still be present, the volume would be reduced significantly.
 I've heard many favorable and some unfavorable reactions to the idea. I've looked to both the Vilas and Dudgeon-Monroe Associations for advice about whether or not, and how to proceed. Whatever is done, I'm virtually certain if it involves closure, it will be preceded by some sort of public meeting and done on a trial basis.
 Monroe Street Library. I want people to be aware, very early in the process, that there area discussions underway by the Library Board concerning possible major improvement to the Monroe Street Library. While firm plans have been proposed, the Library Board is considering the possibility of replacing the current building with a larger structure that could house a bigger more accessible library, additional commercial space and housing opportunities on floors above. The structure could occupy the current lot and adjacent parking utility lands. Clearly, if the parking utility lands were used, replacement parking would have to be part of the project. The logic for this plan, apart from creating additional infield housing, is to create revenue that could help support the library.
 This idea has been discussed only once or twice by the Library Board. I have asked them to involve the neighborhood associations in any potential change.
 Variances. The committee created and chaired by County Board Supervisor Karen Cornwell has completed its report. The report was approved by the Common Council. There are many detailed recommendations but two major initiatives have been given priority status for implementation by the city's planning unit. These include the creation of "Special Exception Areas" which would permit people to expand properties on their lot using an approval process with much less stringent legal standards than the current variance process. The new process would still permit some discretion by some yet to be named committee, and would involve a public hearing and neighbor input. The second change involves the creation of a new zoning code. This code would reflect more traditional neighborhood design elements (e.g. smaller setbacks and side yards). Initially, the code would be available for new developments, but at some point there may be opportunities for considering rezoning to the new code, areas of the city currently zoned R2. The Committee has recommended against wholesale rezoning due to lack of data on the current utilization of zoning lots in our neighborhoods.
 Rail/Bike Path. As you may recall, I sponsored a resolution creating a committee to advise the city on the construction of the Southwest Rail Pedestrian/Bike Path. This committee did some excellent work and was well represented. The city is currently considering their report and will likely adopt the report as a guideline for the engineers designing the path.
 At some point there will be opportunities for further comment and reaction to more detailed plans and specifications developed by city engineering and their contractors. I can't really say when this will happen, but since work on the actual facility is likely to begin next spring, you could plan accordingly. There may be some preliminary work in terms of rail salvage this year. I'll try to keep rail line residents informed of major work under consideration.
 If you want to reach me about these or any other issues, please forward your comments to the following addresses.
 Office of the Common Council Ald. Ken Golden
 210 Martin Luther King, Jr., Blvd.,
 Room 417
 Madison WI 53709
 E-mail: district10@council.ci.madison.wi.us


DMNA Welcome Monroe Street Consignment Antiques

 It opened last fall, so the Monroe Street Consignment Antiques store is a neighbor many of you already know. In fact, 200 consignors, many from this neighborhood, already display their treasures and antiques in the wonderfully crowded store. Joan and Julia, who run the store, have created a homey atmosphere by focusing less on rules ("We basically have only one rule," says Joan. "We don't accept damaged items.") and more on neighborliness. They happily point out that many neighbors have become friends and loyal customers.
 The store is filled with interesting and unique items, something in which Joan and Julia take special pride. The turnover in merchandise is steady, so the sparkling rhinestone earrings you see on Tuesday may be replaced by Friday with a necklace of painted beads. The Eastlake couch you covet on Wednesday may give way to a hand-painted Japanese screen on Thursday. Saturday, if you fall in love with the delicate and beautiful chocolate serving set, you'd better speak up. The good turnover reflects well on Joan's knowledge of and experience with selling antiques and her willingness to work with consignors. (The business returns 70% of the selling price to the consignor. It would be hard to find a better split in the consignment business.) Julia's skill with computers and business on the Internet adds a dimension to this store that enhances its success.
 Stop by the store at 2606 Monroe Street, between Calabash Gifts and Butler Plumbing. Be sure to say "hi" to ZoEB, an American Staffordshire breed and official "shop dog." Store hours are Tuesday through Saturday, 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. and open some Sundays (you may want to call first). All items are consignment items. You should contact Joan or Julia at the store (231-0998) if you have items to sell or are looking to find a particular item.


Tavern Expansion Plans Concern Neighbors

 by Janet Niewold (850 Terry Place) and Beth Goodman (858 Terry Place)

 The Laurel Tavern has proposed a 1,250 square foot addition to the back of its current location adjacent to Wingra Park. Neighbors are concerned about how this addition would impact the neighborhood. Residents close to the bar were invited to a neighborhood meeting organized by Alder Ken Golden.
Owners of The Laurel Tavern, Diane and Peter Zilley, want to expand to create a game room off the back for playing pool and darts as well as upgrade the interior/exterior. They have requested a conditional use permit from the city and a variance to the current parking code to reduce the number of stalls required. Neighbors within 200 feet of the Laurel property were initially notified of the plans. Ken Golden gave notice to a slightly broader group of residences and held a preliminary informational meeting with Diane Zilley. Some are concerned the expansion would exacerbate the noise, traffic and safety problems already experienced. There is concern that a larger Laurel would create a greater opportunity for undesirable behaviors in the adjacent Wingra Park. If you would like more information, please contact Janet Niewold at pniewold@itis.com or call 238-6035. If you would like to receive subsequent mailings about the next phase of the Laurel's expansion request, contact Alder, Ken Golden at 238-4370 or e-mail district10@council.ci.madison.wi.us


Focus on Lake Wingra, Summer 99

Residents of the Lake Wingra watershed may notice some activity in and around their neighborhoods during the summer. With the help of the Friends of Lake Wingra, DNR, Dane County, Edgewood College, and others, the UW-Madison Water Resources Management (WRM) graduate students are focusing their 1999 research and activity on the Lake Wingra watershed.
On Wednesday, March 17, 1999 the Friends of Lake Wingra jointly hosted an advisory group meeting with the WRM students. The main goals were to present the WRM plan of research and activity, as well as to make contact with people who might assist us. Those in attendance included representatives from the DNR, UW and UW-Extension, Dane County, City of Madison, Edgewood College, Vilas Neighborhood Association, Dunn's Marsh Neighborhood Association, Nine Springs Network, Dane County Natural Heritage Foundation, Token Creek, and watershed residents.
During the meeting introductions, each person was asked to provide a question about Lake Wingra to which they would like an answer. This provided quick insight into various perspectives held about Lake Wingra. Questions focused on a variety of topics including physical/chemical/biological characteristics, watershed influences, urban impacts, political/community roles, and folk history. The WRM students then had a chance to present our workplan.
WRM Workplan: Our objective is to develop tools for the improved management of Lake Wingra and its watershed through increased technical understanding, public outreach, and the development of a management framework. Four key questions will help focus our activities: What is the status of Lake Wingra and its watershed? What could it be? What should it be? How do we get there?
In order to achieve our objectives we will be synthesizing existing technical and historical resources, conducting a survey so that we can have watershed resident input, developing a model for stakeholder coordination, conducting several storm water studies focused on runoff and infiltration issues, developing outreach materials, and researching various management options including an innovative and progressive stormwater/watershed utility. We are currently in the midst of our Spring Planning Seminar and have been doing background research on management tools and methods of stakeholder coordination, developing our list of contacts, and planning both the survey and the stormwater studies. In early summer we'll be conducting the survey and stormwater studies, designing public outreach materials and writing technical and historical synthesis documents. In late summer we'll finalize our report and conduct a public presentation of our findings and recommendations.
 We need help in conducting our survey and stormwater studies. Please contact Diane Stocks, WRM Student diane@geology.wisc.edu home: 256-0453 work: 267-0546


Pregnant? Help us Learn How to Prevent Childhood Asthma

There is a exciting new asthma study taking place at University of Wisconsin Medical School, in conjunction with Meriter and St. Mary's Hospitals. This project, termed the Childhood Origins of Asthma or COAST study, will explore the origins of childhood asthma by examining the interaction between heredity and the environment (viral infections). The Center for Disease Control recently released some alarming statistics indicating that the prevalence of childhood asthma has increased by more than 170% in the past decade. In addition, recent data has indicated that the earlier asthma is diagnosed and treated, the greater the chance of preserving the child's lung function over time. Thus, learning more about what initiates asthma and how to identify high risk infants as early as possible, appear to be critical issues.  To complete the project, 200 families who are at increased risk for having an atopic child will need to be recruited over the next year. As a result, we will be recruiting pregnant couples, where the mother, the father, or a sibling of the child has a history of allergies, asthma, or both. The families also must be planning to have their child at either St. Mary's Hospital Medical Center or Meriter Hospital. Subjects will be paid for their participation. For more information about the study, please contact the study coordinators at 263-8539.